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Venice Case

 

Exhibition: Splendors of the Renaissance in Venice, Andrea Schiavone among Parmigianino, Tintoretto and Titian

Exhibition: Splendors of the Renaissance in Venice, Andrea Schiavone among Parmigianino, Tintoretto and Titian This faboulous exhibition will be displayed in Venice at the Correr Museum from November 28, 2015 to April 10, 2016. It is the first exhibition dedicated to Andrea Schiavone a quite innovative painter that was admired by Tintoretto, El Greco and Carracci. In this exhibition one can see 140 works owned by museums, institutions and private collections from different countries. Among them, 80 are by Schiavone. Andrea Meldola - nick named Schiavone - ( born in Zara, 1510 c. – died in Venice, 1563) sparkled on the Renaissance painting school of Venice Republic, with his mysterious and unconventional paintings. His pictorial language divided both the critic and the public. The grand poet Aretino had a great esteem of him, the admirers were fascinating by his artistic personality that stood out of the crowd and was so modern, playing a big role on the scene of the Venice Renaissance golden age. This is the first monographic exhibition and it is the outcome of several decades of researches, a unique opportunity to learn more about the captivating Schiavone.
In this exhibition one can enjoy masterpieces by Parmigianino that was in a way his ideal master , by Jacopo Tintoretto, by Titian and also works by Vasari, Bordon, Salviati and Bassano. These painters were not only important to Schiavone, but gave a great contribute to the extraordinary scenery of Venetian art in the time of the Mannerism. The paintings that are displayed are borrowed from Queen Elizabeth’s Royal Collection, the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Albertina in Vienna, Musée du Louvre in Paris, the London British Museum, the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Croatian Academy of Science and Arts in Zagabria and the Gemäldegalerie in Dresden.




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