A guide in Venice
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Itineraries > Private tours > Art Tours

Contemporary Architecture in Venice

Contemporary Architecture in Venice

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A Tour of 2 Hours:
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This tour gives you an introduction to the work of the modernist Carlo Scarpa. We will visit two buildings whose interiors have been redesigned by him: the Palace Querini Stampalia (1961-63) and the Olivetti Shop (1957-58).

The Palace Querini Stampalia’s ground floor has been altered significantly and to great effect, Scarpa’s water entrance draws you in through the main hall, where to the side you can see the more recent intervention by Mario Botta (2001) and on to the beautiful back garden.
Scarpa’s famous Olivetti Shop, housed in the 15th century Procuratie Vecchie on St. Mark’s Sq. is testament to his extreme attention to detail. This beautiful space with its staircase and bronze sculpture by Alberto Viani has been somewhat tainted by inappropriate use but nonetheless retains a startling modernity.

A Tour of 3 Hours:
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necessitates a choice between two additional areas: San Giobbe (at the rear of Ferovia, the railway station) or the Giudecca Island.

San Giobbe:
the council housing by Vittorio Gregotti (1984-86) succeeds in marrying a modern aesthetic with the traditional Venetian urban environment. Nearby you can also visit the 19th century slaughterhouse, a piece of industrial archaeology transformed into a university department by Vittorio Spigai (2000). This site was initially proposed for Corbusier’s grand project, the New Hospital of Venice.

Giudecca:
on the west end of the island there are four interesting contemporary buildings; council housing by Gino Valle (1980-86) and opposite this on Sacca Fisola Island, another complex of houses by Mainardis, Cappai and Pastor (1982-89); the houses of Cino Zucchi (1997-2000) and finally an interesting adaptation of an already existing piece of industrial architecture, a brewery transformed into social housing by Gambirasio (1980).